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Sid M. Khosla, MD

Associate Professor of Otolaryngology

Department
Otolaryngology (ENT)
Specialties
Otolaryngology, Ear, Nose & Throat, Cancer, Oncology, Voice Disorders, Swallowing Disorders, Adult Airway Reconstruction, Laryngeal Cancer
.Sid M. Khosla, MD photo

Practice Locations

  • Clifton

    • UC Health Physicians Office (Clifton)

      222 Piedmont Avenue
      Suite 5200
      Cincinnati, Ohio 45219

      Phone: (513) 475-8400
      Fax: (513) 475-8228
      Map and Directions
  • West Chester

    • UC Health Physicians Office North (West Chester)

      7690 Discovery Drive
      Suite 3900
      West Chester, Ohio 45069

      Phone: (513) 475-8400
      Fax: (513) 475-8271
      Map and Directions

Bio

Sid Khosla, MD, specializes in treating voice and swallowing disorders, and is a partner with Rebecca Howell, MD, at the UC Health Voice and Swallowing Center. 

Dr. Khosla is nationally known for his expertise in vocal cord and airway reconstruction. Under the direction of the only fellowship trained Laryngologist in the region, his team provides several methods to view the larynx, evaluate vocal conditions, examine and evaluate voice conditions. These methods are customized to the needs of each patient for professional voice users.  Singers, actors, entertainers and media professionals have very unique vocal demands. Lawyers, members of the clergy, politicians, professors and teachers also fit into this group. The UC Health Performance & Professional Voice Center has built relationships with the local and national voice and singing community to become the premier center in Cincinnati treating patients from the Cincinnati Opera, College of Conservatory Music at the University of Cincinnati, the Cincinnati Symphony, and traveling artists performing in the Cincinnati area.  The Center was pleased to be a part of the UC Health sponsorship of the 2012 World Choir Games, where its role focused on the clinical and educational aspects of the UC Health mission. During the Games, the Center provided clinical services to any singer with voice problems, as well as multiple lectures and other educational activities focusing on voice care for professional singers.

In addition to his clinical expertise, Dr. Khosla is a leader in the research field pioneering new techniques to treat voice and swallowing disorders. Dr. Khosla has been awarded an R01 grant from the National Institutes of Health.  As one of only six laryngologists in the world to have a R01 NIH award, Dr. Khosla is well qualified to integrate cutting edge research findings into clinical care. A devoted member to the Cincinnati community, Dr. Khosla serves as a member on the Cincinnati Opera Board. 

Education

Medical School
Wake Forest University School of Medicine - Winston-Salem, NC
Residency
Washington University School of Medicine/Barnes Jewish Hospital - St. Louis, MO
Fellowship
Washington University School of Medicine - St. Louis, MO (Laryngology and Voice Disorders)

Board Certifications

American Board of Otolaryngology 

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