Neurorestorative Program

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The Neurorestorative Program at the University of Cincinnati Gardner Neuroscience Institute is an integrated multidisciplinary program focused around one goal: restoring function to patients who suffer from painful or life-altering neurological impairments. The neurorestorative team includes renowned specialists who focus on innovations in the surgical treatment of neurological conditions such as epilepsy, pain and movement disorders, along with medical treatment of mood disorders such as obsessive-compulsive disorder and depression.

Many patients who benefit from neurorestorative services also interact with other areas of the Neuroscience Institute in order to receive the most comprehensive care available. With help from our Neurorestorative Program, patients see improvements in symptom control and an increasingly better quality of life.

NeuroRestorative Program Helps Patients
Regain Function Lost to Pain, Movement Disorders, Epilepsy >>

 

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