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Krishna Mohan, MD

Department
Neurosurgery
Specialties
Neurosurgery, Neuroscience, Brain Tumors, Cancer, Oncology, Neurocritical Care
.Krishna Mohan, MD photo

Bio

Krishna Mohan, MD, has been a Neurointensivist at the UC Neuroscience Institute and an Associate Professor of Neurosurgery at the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine since 2008.

Prior to his time at the University of Cincinnati Medical Center, Dr. Mohan spent three years as a Pulmonologist at St. Luke Hospital in Florence, Kentucky, and he also practiced privately in Philadelphia and Charleston, South Carolina.

Dr. Mohan is married and has 2 children.  He enjoys reading and playing tennis.

    Education

    Medical School
    Christian Medical College - Vellore, India
    Residency
    Thomas Jefferson University Hospital - Philadelphia, PA
    Fellowship
    Thomas Jefferson University Hospital - Philadelphia, PA

    Board Certifications

    Internal Medicine
    Pulmonary Diseases 
    Critical Care Medicine
    Neurocritical Care
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