Share

Gavin Udstuen, MD

Assistant Professor of Radiology

Department
Radiology
Specialties
Radiology, Imaging, Neuroradiology, Brain Tumors, Cancer, Oncology
.Gavin Udstuen, MD photo

Practice Locations

  • Clifton

    • University of Cincinnati Medical Center

      234 Goodman Street
      Cincinnati, Ohio 45219

      Phone: (513) 584-1584
      Map and Directions

Bio

Gavin Udstuen, MD, is a staff neuroradiologist and a member of UC Physicians, while teaching at the University of Cincinnati as an assistant professor.  His primary responsibility is as Medical Director of University Pointe Imaging Center (UPIC) in West Chester.  He interprets studies performed at UPIC as well as other locations within the UC Health system, with a focus on diagnostic neuroradiology.

His professional interests include brain neoplasms, head and neck imaging, vascular pathology and degenerative spine disease. He has completed a Bachelor of Science from Duke University, a degree in Medicine from the University of Cincinnati, an internship at Good Samaritan Hospital, a diagnostic radiology residency from the University of Cincinnati, and a fellowship in Diagnostic Neuroradiology from the University of Cincinnati. After graduating from his fellowship, he went into private practice in Ashland, Kentucky until joining the UC Neuroradiology Department in late 2002.

He is currently involved in a number of initiatives and committees related to practice development and outpatient imaging center performance. He completed the Maintenance of Certification process for Certificate of Added Qualification in Neuroradiology in 2012. He has three children and enjoys playing ice hockey and guitar in his spare time.

Professional Memberships
  • American Society of Neuroradiology
  • American Roentgen Ray Society
  • Radiologic Society of North America
  • American College of Radiology

Education

Medical School
University of Cincinnati College of Medicine - Cincinnati, OH
Residency
University of Cincinnati/University Hospital - Cincinnati, OH (Diagnostic Radiology)
Fellowship
University of Cincinnati/University Hospital - Cincinnati, OH

Board Certifications

American Board of Radiology, lifetime certificate 
American Board of Radiology, CAQ neuroradiology, MOC process current
  • Print This Page
  • Make an Appointment: Schedule Now
  • Sign up for our newsletter!
  • UCNI Weekly Blog
  • Hope Stories

    • Troy’s Story: Proton Therapy for Brain Cancer

      Troy's Story: Proton Therapy for Brain Cancer Troy Witt, 65, a London, Kentucky resident and a self-proclaimed "country boy,” says he loves his family, fishing, woodworking and riding on his tractor. But all of these activities have been put on hold since spring 2016 when Witt’s...
    • Lynne’s Story

      Lynne's StorySemiretired and working part-time at a restaurant, Lynne knew something was amiss when she looked at the cash register and then struggled to make her hands produce the correct amount of change. Could she have suffered a stroke? Lynne pushed the...
    • Mary Ann’s Story: Cervical Dystonia

      Mary Ann’s Story: Cervical Dystonia Mary Ann, a registered nurse, was the first to notice that her head was tilting ever so slightly to the left. She was able to ignore it for a while, but over time the tilt became more obvious and disfiguring....
    • Amber’s Story: Ruptured Aneurysm

      Amber's Story: Ruptured Aneurysm The only visible sign of Amber Gray’s ordeal is the long slender scar that runs along her forearm. It is the area where a surgeon carefully removed her radial artery, which was needed to bypass a damaged artery in her...
    • Amy’s Story: A Battle With MS

      Amy's Story: A Battle With MSIn retrospect, multiple sclerosis had probably been stalking Amy for a long time. She had suffered from chronic headaches in high school, and her seasonal allergies had been over the top. Then, in her mid-30s, the busy wife and mother...
    • Richard’s Story: Ruptured Aneurysms

      Richard's Story: Ruptured Aneurysms Almost three years ago, Richard “Dick” Watson, MD, found himself in an unfamiliar position for a doctor: lying on the operating table instead of standing over it. He didn’t know it at the time, but it was the beginning of...
    • Marlene’s Story: Facebook was her Friend

      Marlene's Story: Facebook was her Friend In treating a stroke, time is brain. Because treatment must be administered within 3 to 4 ½ hours to be eff ective, one of the first things a doctor or EMT must do is determine the moment when the stroke...
    • Lynne’s Story: Brain Metastasis

      Lynne's Story: Brain MetastasisSemiretired and working part-time at a restaurant, Lynne knew something was amiss when she looked at the cash register and then struggled to make her hands produce the correct amount of change. Could she have suffered a stroke? Lynne pushed the...
    • Rick’s Story: After 45 Years, He Got the Help He Needed

      Rick's Story: After 45 Years, He Got the Help He Needed Rick’s strategy for managing his epilepsy wasn’t perfect, but it had worked well enough for most of his career as a theme park project manager who traveled the world. Whether he worked in Australia, Malaysia, Singapore or Germany, his routine...
    • Alicia’s Story: Multiple Sclerosis

      Alicia’s Story: Multiple SclerosisAlicia is relishing a life that is filled to the brim: she is a wife, a mother, a runner and a master at living with multiple sclerosis. Diagnosed in the late 1990s, Alicia had “a bumpy ride” in the beginning. But...